People

People have been an integral part of the Barangaroo landscape for thousands of years. The Traditional Custodians, the Gadigal, used the land for hunting, the harbour for fishing and the foreshore as a place of congregation.

After the arrival of Europeans in the 18th Century, Barangaroo’s industrial and maritime story began. The area eventually transformed from a small South Pacific port to a gateway destination for migrants and shipping, and finally a modern container terminal. Thousands of people worked in and around the area and, during the Great Depression, men desperate for work on the wharves referred to it as the Hungry Mile.

In 2015, Barangaroo was opened to the public for the first time in more than 100 years, allowing people to engage with this part of Sydney’s CBD as never before.
In its first year, some 900,000 people visited the re‑created headland.

Working in close consultation with the local Aboriginal community has seen the creation of a development that respects and honours the Traditional Custodians.

Barangaroo is still a development in progress – with completion not due until 2024 – however, it is now as much about the people who live, work and visit here as it is about making a place.

People

People have been an integral part of the Barangaroo landscape for thousands of years. The Traditional Custodians, the Gadigal, used the land for hunting, the harbour for fishing and the foreshore as a place of congregation.

After the arrival of Europeans in the 18th Century, Barangaroo’s industrial and maritime story began. The area eventually transformed from a small South Pacific port to a gateway destination for migrants and shipping, and finally a modern container terminal. Thousands of people worked in and around the area and, during the Great Depression, men desperate for work on the wharves referred to it as the Hungry Mile.

In 2015, Barangaroo was opened to the public for the first time in more than 100 years, allowing people to engage with this part of Sydney’s CBD as never before.
In its first year, some 900,000 people visited the re‑created headland.

Working in close consultation with the local Aboriginal community has seen the creation of a development that respects and honours the Traditional Custodians.

Barangaroo is still a development in progress – with completion not due until 2024 – however, it is now as much about the people who live, work and visit here as it is about making a place.